Meewella | Critic

According to P

Tag: Christopher Walken

QuickView: Turks & Caicos (2014)

“Nowadays, people will go anywhere to avoid paying tax. A quick visit to Lichtenstein, Monaco, maybe Jersey; empty the vaults of private wealth, and you could write off the world’s debt.”

Curtis Pelissier

Following the events of Page Eight, former intelligence analyst Johnny Worricker has his quiet life of self-imposed exile in the Caribbean disturbed when he is recognised by a visitor to the islands. The tropical location may at first give the impression of a bigger budget globetrotting adventure, but the stage remains small, confined almost entirely to the Turks & Caicos Islands. In his desire to keep his head down and protect himself through friendships with the locals, Nighy’s charming Worricker has more in common with Rick in Casablanca than with Bond. The plot is a poorly paced follow-the-money affair in which Worricker finds himself aiding the CIA out of self-interest, none of which is as compelling as the whistleblowing story of Page Eight. Hare throws in pithy analysis of global fianance and politics, but it feels scattershot. Bill Nighy carries the film but it again attracts a strong supporting cast, even if the choice of Christopher Walken will leave some bemused.

6/10

Worricker trilogy: Page Eight | Turks & Caicos | Salting the Battlefield

QuickView: The Jungle Book (2016)

“Shift your hunting ground for a few years and everyone forgets how the law works. Well, let me remind you. A man-cub becomes man, and man is forbidden!”

Shere Khan

Although commonly labelled live-action, that is not entirely accurate since Neel Sethi is the only actor who appears onscreen, with CGI filling the space around him. A wobbly opening scene concerned me but generally the CGI is excellent, with breathtaking vibrant jungle vistas when the camera pulls back to capture characters in silhouette. The A-list voice talent can be a little distracting, although Bill Murray is an inspired choice for Baloo. Similarly, retaining just a few of the Disney songs is a stranger choice than excising them entirely. Sethi‚Äôs Mowgli is believably curious, isolated and angry, Favreau drawing out an impressive performance against empty green screens. It is not a classic, but the original was not Disney at its height either and this stands comfortably alongside it.

7/10

"A film is a petrified fountain of thought."

(CC) BY-NC 2003-2023 Priyan Meewella

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